Microsoft Sabotaging Pre Win 8.1 Windows Systems? New bad update info at bottom.

Microsoft Sabotaging Pre Win 8.1 Windows Systems? New bad update info at bottom.
The Windows 10 Paradox, by DoctorLaptop-Nerja
Will Windows (Win) 10 make your computer obsolete before it’s worn out? If you upgraded from version 7 or 8 it is possible. While your comp may have passed compatibility checks, and the Win 10 Update seems to have installed correctly and has been working flawlessly for a few months, the compatibility check was with an early version of Win 10. It is not a guaranty of compatibility with all future Win 10 incarnations. Win 10 is the last of the numbered Win series, Microsoft (MS) has declared. There will not be a new version of Win released, only upgrades and build releases. All improvements will be included in new Win 10 updates or builds (builds are like service packs, just jargon for a large bunch a bunch of updates and new feature installers grouped together).
Now following that logic, since Win 10 continues to add new features (and keep in mind that you cannot block Win 10 updating itself), eventually some of these updates will add features that your old hardware just is not designed to handle. The result will be your comp crashes when you reboot. At that point you will no longer be able to start that unit normally, only in Safe Mode. MS has effectively deemed your computer obsolete. So you will have to uninstall that last update and maybe MS will find a way to let you block that feature(but don’t bet on it, MS would rather you buy a new comp so they can force you into buying all new software from them) and at that point if you can’t block the offending feature you can’t use that comp on the internet again unless you re-install a pre-Win 10 version of Win or a non-Win Operating System.
The best you can hope for then as regards to Win 10 on units that were originally Win 7/8 is to extend the lifespan as much as possible. The main thing you can do in this regard, short of replacing your processor, which is prohibitively expensive, is to have your BIOS updated (this requires “flashing” the BIOS) to the newest possible version before doing the upgrade from Win 7 or 8 to Win 10. Be aware flashing your BIOS is a risky process, if it fails, which happens in a small but significant percent of cases, the computer becomes unstartable and needs to be serviced by the manufacturer to replace the damaged BIOS ,as it requires special equipment to do. As everyone should know by now, before doing an upgrade to Win 10 you must fully update your computer with all available Windows Updates and all Driver Updates from your computer manufacturer. These manufacturer driver updates must include the BIOS update if available, although the BIOS update is often overlooked. But the BIOS is a kind of driver, a driver for your processor, and often referred to as “firmware” rather than a driver, thus the confusion. So updating the BIOS before upgrading to Win 10 is often overlooked, and the upgrade may initially seem to have been successful. But the problem is, and I am now seeing cases of this, that after a few months of using the upgraded Win 10 without any problems, suddenly Win 10 crashes and will not restart, or allow a Refresh or Rollback! Why? Some newly installed feature requires support from your hardware or BIOS that you don’t have. The only fix seems to be a fresh install of an older version of Win that was working without problems. You can re-install an earlier version of Win 10 but that only works till that update that caused the problem in the first place is attempted again, and over which you have no control if using the comp on the internet. You’d be better served to go back to Win 8.1 or 7.
Now lets take this to the next logical step. MS has insider knowledge and major influence over the computer parts and chips makers. Thus they can now plan ahead when to introduce new features that will will only work with newly available hardware or Bios versions. And they will use this info to set up lifecycles for all new computers, using planned obsolescence to shorten the lifespan of all new computers to a limit they determine is to their shareholders best interests. This is a whole new level of control MS now has over your computer that didn‘t exist before Win 10, when you still had control of new updates and features and whether or not you chose to install them. Now you know why they are giving Win 10 away for free and pushing the upgrade so hard. They can now force users to only get software from MS approved sources and MS and basically determine when you will need to replace your computer.
A New Win 7 Update To Avoid
Earlier this year MS warned users that Win 7 has serious problems. I dismissed it’s claims as a desperate attempt to shift Win 7 users to Win 10 (and I still do), but now MS has warned of a new serious Win 7 problem that is very real – even though it makes no sense whatsoever…As InfoWorld’s Win expert Woody Leonhard notes “I’m now seeing problems reported from all over the globe about Win 7 machines that suddenly won’t boot”. The cause? MS has made a seemingly small yet completely bizarre tweak to Win Update on Win 7 and confirmed it is crippling many users’ PCs. The tweak? It switched the status of Win 7 update KB3133977 from ‘Optional’ to ‘Recommended’. The bizarre part? Despite acknowledging the problems, MS knew they would occur in advance and it has no plans to do anything about it. Win 7 users need to read this article to determine if they are at risk.
And people wonder why geeks call Bill Gates the anti-Christ, well now you know…
Email me if you need any help with these issues, doctorlaptop @ gmx.com, Gmail users check your Junk/Spam folder for my replies.
Naythan

 

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